Reading

Reading at key stages 1 and 2 consist of two dimensions:

  • word reading
  • comprehension (both listening and reading).

Skilled word reading involves both the speedy working out of the pronunciation of unfamiliar printed words (decoding) and the speedy recognition of familiar printed words. Underpinning both is the understanding that the letters on the page represent the sounds in spoken words. This is why phonics is emphasised in the early teaching of reading.

Good comprehension draws from linguistic knowledge (in particular of vocabulary and grammar) and on knowledge of the world. Comprehension skills develop through pupils’ experience of high-quality discussion with the teacher, as well as from reading and discussing a range of stories, poems and non-fiction. All pupils are encouraged to read widely across both fiction and non-fiction to develop their knowledge of themselves and the world in which they live, to establish an appreciation and love of reading, and to gain knowledge across the curriculum. Reading widely and often increases pupils’ vocabulary because they encounter words they would rarely hear or use in everyday speech. Reading also feeds pupils’ imagination and opens up a treasure-house of wonder and joy for curious young minds.

Reading is taught initially through shared stories (EYFS) leading to more formal ‘Daily Supported Reading’ in Reception and Year 1. This is a reading programme that ensures all children have daily opportunities to read independently, in small groups, at their ability level with a trained adult. This continues into early Year 2 alongside Guided Reading sessions. In Key Stage 2 these Guided Reading sessions continue with a focus on key strategies for comprehending messages and accessing information.

Reading at Hollydale School

At Hollydale school we take a great pride in our children’s attitude to and love of reading. Events such as Book Week have paved the way for a real enthusiasm in developing the essential skill of reading. Learning to read the words on a page is just one small part of developing a lifelong enjoyment of reading and an ability to use reading to discover new things. Our aim at Hollydale School is to help children become independent readers who enjoy reading and learn from it.

Taking a book to read at home is just one part of our children’s reading diet. At Hollydale School children enjoy reading books they have chosen quietly in our class reading corners, in the library, with a peer or supporting a younger child as a reading buddy. They enjoy reading a range of different texts with staff during a wide variety of lessons to support their learning. They also read individually with a teacher,  teaching assistant or Volunteer reader.

Each child’s reading diet is specifically tailored to their individual interests and need. We use the Oxford Reading Tree, Dandelion Readers and Collins Big Cat scheme which offer a wide choice of new texts which include traditional tales, classics, a range of up to date and relevant non-fiction texts, poetry and even graphic novels.

At school, children develop a range of reading skills throughout the curriculum including whole class sessions, one to one reading and reading independently.  Staff and volunteers regularly record information about the reading your child has done at school in their reading record.  This will be in the form of a comment or a sticker.  Below is some information about the ways in which we teach children to read at school.

Whole class teaching – Whole class teaching happens throughout the day.  Children are exposed to a wide range of texts in Literacy and across all areas of the curriculum, both fiction and non-fiction.  They use their reading skills to find and interoperate information across a wide range of subjects. Specific reading objectives are targeted through exercises such as ‘Text Talk’, Independent Reading, Reading a class text and Comprehension Skills.  These objectives are varied as required depending on the needs of the individual children.

Reading with a teacher – All children can expect to have a small group reading session regularly with a teacher.  During these reading sessions the teacher will target specific children to read with the aim of focusing on a specific objective as well as discussing the text and supporting the child’s enthusiasm and engagement in a wide range of texts in order to support the development of positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read.

Reading with a TA – All children will have the opportunity to read with a TA regularly.  Some children will, based on specific needs, be daily or weekly readers with a TA.  TAs will focus on specific objective as well as discussing the text and supporting the child’s enthusiasm and engagement in a wide range of texts in order to support the development of positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read.

Reading with a volunteer – Some children will, based on individual need, be daily or weekly readers with a trained Volunteer.  Volunteers will focus on specific objective as well as discussing the text and supporting the child’s enthusiasm and engagement in a wide range of texts in order to support the development of positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read.

Reading with a buddy – Some children from UKS2 have weekly reading sessions with a Buddy in EYFS and KS1. The Buddy’s focus with be discussing the text and supporting the child’s and engagement in a wide range of texts in order to support the development of positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read.

Yr 2 Child ‘I really like it when my reading buddy helps me out with my reading. I am also really enjoying my book.’

Yr 2 Child ‘I like it when I learn new words and my partner helps me with the meaning so I understand.’

Yr 6 Child ‘It’s really nice to help the younger children with their reading and teach them something new.’

Yr 6 Child ‘It makes you proud when the children learn a new word, I feel proud.’

What we read:

In class reading provision – Every classroom has a dedicated reading area in which children have access to a wide range of fiction and non-fiction texts.  If a specific text is not available they are able to request it.  Children are also given access to a wide range of ‘real’ texts throughout the curriculum.

 

KS1 Reading

KS2 Reading

Other links

Teach Your Monster to Read

Oxford Reading Owl

To provide you with help and advice and some practical resources to support your children with reading at home:

Literacy Trust